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Third world country

Spike is living in Manila and all is not well: A Scam A Day Keeps The Philippines A Third World Country.

I’ve been coming here since 1997. On my first trip, I remember seeing people in the street selling single cigarettes and single sticks of gum. I said to myself, “This is a poor country.” 20 years later, I still pass people selling those single cigarettes.

[…] at the core this is still a desperately poor country and the biggest export here still seems to be people.

Almost everywhere you go in the world you will find Filipinos who have left the country to earn a living. Two of the smartest people I have worked with in Hong Kong are Filipinos, but many of their compatriots are way over-qualified for the jobs they are doing, often in the service industries (it is a rule that musicians in hotels throughout Asia have to be Filipinos).

As Spike says, when the brightest and best leave the country, where does that leave the ones who are left behind?


Why I switched on comment moderation

Some recent comments:

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You have a good understanding of China! Deeply the Chinese people I admire you! Thank you for your love! We will be better in China

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Happy Christmas and links updated

I have been taken to task by Mr Spike for linking to his old site, and I can't deny that a review of my list of Hong Kong blogs was long overdue.  It also turns out that Mr Hemlock has finally closed down his old site and moved to Wordpress, and a few old favourites have stopped alogether.

Oh, and Happy Christmas.


RSS - win one, lose one

Well, well.  I see that Hemlock has fixed his RSS feed, a mere 3 or 4 years after it stopped working.  I'm afraid that I can't be bothered going to a website to read a blog, so I have been missing his words of wisdom for quite some time.

Fumier's RSS feed disappeared some time ago, and I suppose this must be a policy decision (because he also deletes old postings after a month or so).  Still, the old fool usually sends me an email if he makes a reference to this blog, so I guess I'm not missing anything.    


Tidying up

I finally got round to reviewing my list of Hong Kong blogs, and I've pruned a few that have either disappeared or not been updated for several months.  I also re-instated one old favourite that went missing but which seems to be back, back, back.


Top 20 websites in Hong Kong: #8 - fearless, with slapdash grammar

image Imagine my reaction upon reading Post Magazine in yesterday's Sunday Morning Post when I discovered that OrdinaryGweilo.com is one of the top 20 websites in Hong Kong.

My delight was somewhat diminished by a couple of things.

Firstly, that this list appears to have thrown together without very much research.  One might almost say it was slapdash...

imageFor example, #11 is a site (Glutter) which hasn't been updated for about 4 months.  Also, I think I must point out that the author of Glutter (Yan Sham-Shackleton) is, of course, a woman, as a cursory glance through the website (or a Google search) would probably reveal.  And (as ulaca rightly points out), she is also no longer a resident of Hong Kong.

Secondly, I don't think anyone has taken any notice.  I dutifully checked my site statistics yesterday, and the impact of this mention appears to be somewhere between minimal and inconsequential.

However, I have to say that it cheered me up to be described as 'fearless'. 

Continue reading "Top 20 websites in Hong Kong: #8 - fearless, with slapdash grammar" »


Chinese news in English

Tau Tiul Yat Bow has a very simple concept - take the top story from HK Headline News (a free Chinese language newspaper) and translate the headline into English.

"Staff have no right to ask for alcohol test"
職員 ( jig yuen ) = staff
無權 ( mo queng ) = no right
要求 ( yau qui ) = request
吹波波 ( chui ball ball ) = alcohol test
黃宏發 ( wong hong fat ) = 1997 legislative council member
( zui ) = drunk
( now ) = disturb
港鐵 ( kong tit ) = MTR
( zhang ) = station
http://www.hkheadline.com/news/html_wnn/html/2008/1/25/wnn43270.html?section_name=wnn

Apologies, but I've forgotten where I saw this mentioned.